New To Stand-up Comedy? A Great Starting Point: ComedyUniversity.com

tap-into-talent2If you are trying to discover the techniques to somehow “write” a stand-up comedy act that actually works to generate big laughs…

Please allow me to offer an alternative perspective that may be of immense value to you — especially if you want to have a significant advantage over other new comedians when you enter the world of stand-up comedy.

And that perspective is this: you already have much of what you need to develop a powerful stand-up comedy act very quickly if you will use and apply all of your comedy talent right from the start of the process.

But if you are like most new comedians, you will disregard most of what makes you a funny person in everyday life when you make the decision to step into becoming a comedian — giving you no advantage at all.

Before I continue, know this:

How you decide to approach stand-up comedy is 100% your call. However if you will sit through any stand-up comedy open mic night, you will surely see for yourself what happens when a comedian does not use and apply their comedy talent effectively — if at all.

Conditions That Contribute Not Using One’s Comedy Talent

Here are three conditions that directly impact why new comedians don’t really tap into their comedy talent when they hit the stage as a comedian:

1. New comedians don’t realize that “writing” and verbal communication (talking) are NOT the same communication medium.

Let me put this another way:

“Writing” as you have learned how to do it is not an interchangeable version of talking like most new comedians assume it to be.

Writing is a formal means of communication designed for consumption by an individual reader, not a live in-person audience.

Probably one of the biggest problems with trying to “write” jokes or stand-up comedy material is that HUGE elements of an individual’s comedy talent are missing because only words are involved.

Not only that, the mental process for “writing” is completely different than for talking. Hint: You never hear anyone talk about having “talker’s block”.

Since stand-up comedy is all about talking and expressing one’s sense of humor…

Enough said about that.

2. New comedians assume that some sort of “special” comedy talent needs to be developed in order to generate the big laughs they want on stage.

Short of some sort of brain transplant or the futuristic “uploading” of a better sense of humor, you have got what you’ve when it comes to comedy talent.

Think about it: The sense of humor you have right now and the way you individually express that sense of humor is the result of many 100,000’s of personal conversations and interactions with others — starting from the time you started talking as a child.

That aspect is NOT going to change because you make the decision to become a comedian.

Note: The comedy talent you have right now was NOT developed by passing 100,000’s of written notes between people you have communicated with in your life in person.

What you need to know is this:

When you cause others to laugh in everyday conversations, you are using 100% of your comedy talent.

As a comedian, you should strive to use ALL of your comedy talent in a more condensed and concentrated way (because you need to generate 4-6 laughs every performing minute.

Otherwise, you are going to end up flopping like most new comedians do.

3. New comedians don’t realize that there is a lot to know about using, preparing and packaging their already developed comedy talent for consumption by a live audience — before they ever step on stage.

Think about this: More than likely you came to this blog thinking you simply needed a few “tips” that will help you get the big laughs on stage quickly.

What I will tell you is this:

As comedian you are tasked with creating, developing and delivering a solid comedy entertainment product that causes audiences to laugh out loud 4-6 times every minute you are on stage.

But don’t take my word for it — get on stage and suck for a year or two. Then you will fully understand why a few “tips” are simply not enough.

The Wrap Up

The last time you were in a casual conversation with a group of your friends, family or co-workers and you caused laughter to happen:

  • Did you stop to “write” the words you were going to use to make others laugh?
  • Was it just the words alone that you said that caused the people you were talking with to laugh?
  • Were you aware of the actual body language, facial expressions and voice tone qualities you used to make others laugh?
  • What exactly did you say to make others laugh?

Here’s a secret relatively few new comedians will ever take advantage of – one which will directly impact the speed at which an individual can progress as a comedian and that is:

Secret: What makes an individual funny in everyday life is a combination of attributes specific to you that occur spontaneously without much thought.

It will be that exact same combination of attributes that will also cause audiences to laugh long and loud from the stand-up comedy stage.

I cover this aspect of laughter generation starting at the end of Episode 1 of the Stand-up Comedy Secrets For Beginners audio series.

In other words, the comedy mechanics that you use to generate laughs in casual conversations are exactly the same as those used on the stand-up comedy stage.

But a weird thing seems to happen when an individual makes the decision to become a comedian…

They discount or ignore those attributes that got them into stand-up comedy in the first place and seem to be compelled to attempt to “write” their way (in the literal sense) to being funny on stage – usually with less optimal results.

If you don’t believe that, again, sit through any stand-up comedy open mic night from beginning to end.

“Winging it” (aka blind trial and error) is also a less than optimal approach if a person wants to make measurable progress in any reasonable period of time (weeks vs. months or years).

If you want to know why the Killer Stand-up Online Course blows away every other stand-up comedy “writing” resource out there, here’s why:

  • It provides you with detailed insight on how to recognize what makes you funny in the first place.
  • It shows you how to apply your already developed comedy talent in a way that is natural you and your since of humor – right from the beginning of the comedy material development process.
  • It shows you how to professionally prepare to deliver stand-up comedy material in a way that, once again, capitalizes on all the attributes that make you a funny person in everyday life.

Common sense dictates that if you are aware of what makes you funny in everyday life and you know how to apply that knowledge when developing your stand-up comedy act…

You will progress much more quickly than those who are trying to “mechanically” produce “funny” from a blank piece of paper, focusing on mere words alone.

And again, you don’t hear anyone mention anything about “talker’s block”.

Plus talking is and always will be easier than trying to “write” anything.

Like I said at the beginning of this article – you have much of what you need in the way of comedy talent to produce a powerful stand-up comedy act if you will learn how to use and apply it specifically for the stand-up comedy stage.

About 

Leading stand-up comedy educator and trainer, providing proven 21st century strategies and techniques for individuals who wish to become comedians on a professional level. For a detailed stand-up comedy resume go to: Steve Roye's Stand-up Resume.